• GSA Awards Logan Simpson Multiple Award Schedule Contract for Environmental and GIS Services

    Logan Simpson has a new General Services Administration (GSA) Multiple Award Services (MAS) contract to provide environmental services. The contract took effect October 5, 2021. Logan Simpson has provided federal agencies with environmental planning and GIS services through the GSA for nearly two decades. The new contract includes additional labor categories for environmental, biology, and cultural resource services, allowing us to bid work more competitively.

    What is an MAS Contract?

    GSA MAS contracts create a pool of prequalified contractors, saving federal agencies save time in the procurement process. GSA has determined Logan Simpson is fully qualified to provide environmental services under Special Identification Numbers (SINs) 541620 (environmental services) and 541370GIS (GIS services).

    How Can Agencies Use the MAS Contract?

    Agencies can use the GSA MAS contract in place of internal procurements. The contract can be used for one-time projects or to establish blanket purchase agreements (BPAs). BPAs are indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contracts that ensure skilled contractors like Logan Simpson are available to meet needs as they arise.

    For more information about the GSA MAS contracting process, Visit GSA’s How to Buy Through GSA page or reach out to the MAS National Customer Service Center at 800-488-3111.

    Contract Number 47QRAA22D0004
  • Join Us at the 2021 Roads and Streets Conference in Tucson!

    Join us at the 2021 Roads and Streets Conference in Tucson October 6 – 8. Arizona’s premier transportation conference went virtual in recent years due to Covid. We’re looking forward to seeing our clients and teaming partners in person this year! Stop by to see us!

  • Best Practices in Planning and Permitting for Large Solar Installations Presentation

    Logan Simpson Principal Jeremy Call and three other panelists will deliver presentation entitled Best Practices in Planning and Permitting for Large Solar Installations at the Energy and the Environment Leadership Symposium at the University of Northern Colorado October 7 – 8. The presentation focuses on best practices for engaging stakeholders. Panelists will discuss how to apply those practices to real-world applications. The panelists will also share actual examples of successful permitting of solar installations. Jeremy previously presented Are You Ready?: Creating Your City/County Roadmap to Large-Scale, Low-Impact Solar Energy at an APA – Colorado Solar and Storage Association webinar this spring. Listen to it here.

    Best Practices in Planning and Permitting for Large Solar Installations presenters include:

    Jeremy Call, Principal, Logan Simpson

    Mike Kruger, CEO, Colorado Solar and Storage Association

    Patrick Nolan, Director of Project Development, Leeward Energy

    Tom Parko, Planning Director, Weld County

  • Viestenz-Smith Mountain Park Wins ASLA Honor Award

    Logan Simpson is proud to announce that we have received the ASLA Colorado’s Honor Award for Viestenz-Smith Mountain Park!

    Viestenz-Smith Mountain Park is a park and natural area along the Big Thompson River and US 34.  The park was destroyed in 2013 by a devastating flood. This reconstruction was the opportunity to create a more resilient river and public park that is appropriate for its setting in the Foothills Life Zone of the Rocky Mountains. The park features a realigned and more natural river, native aquatic and terrestrial habitat restoration, trails, picnic areas, river access, and educational exhibits and structures. A unique platform provides an authentic river fishing experience for users of all abilities, overlooks and benches are located along the trails, and visitors can learn about the history and ecology of the site.  Remnants of a 1920’s hydroelectric plant, a settlers’ cabin from the 1860s, Civilian Conservation Corps shelters, and other historic structures provide not only visual interest, but are a reminder that many lessons learned in the past are still relevant today. The park is loved by Loveland residents and visitors, and is at capacity every weekend that it is open.

  • Logan Simpson takes on the next 30 years under new leadership

    After founding Logan Simpson and successfully leading the firm’s 30 years of guiding responsible change, Diane Simpson-Colebank is stepping down as president and CEO. Diane will continue to serve as a principal of the firm focusing on key projects and clients. The firm celebrates Diane’s many accomplishments and is grateful for her efforts in developing the next generation of leaders that will carry the firm’s mission and legacy into the future. 

    Diane will be handing the reins to a familiar face, Bruce Meighen, whom the firm’s shareholders unanimously elected to be the next CEO.  Bruce—a principal from our Fort Collins, Colorado office who has been with Logan Simpson for close to a decade—is an idealist with a passion for creativity and innovation backed by 25 years of experience. Bruce holds degrees in business, environmental systems, and city planning from Champlain College, McGill University, and Georgia Tech.   He served as a vice president at two of the nation’s largest planning firms and has been part of the leadership team at Logan Simpson. Bruce brings an infectious enthusiasm for this evolution of the firm. He is grateful for his partners’ trust and will focus on evolving our current practices and emerging services that tackle today’s new environmental, cultural resource, planning, and design challenges.  

    Logan Simpson’s upcoming leaders have acquired the firm—a rarity in today’s consulting market—demonstrating the trust that Logan Simpson’s shareholders have in the firm’s leaders. To undertake an internal transition and become a trusted, legacy organization, any firm must have a pool of talented leaders, and Logan Simpson has such a group.  Thought leaders such as Jana McKenzie, Patricia McCabe, Erick Laurila, Jeremy Call and Wayne Colebank will collaborate with Bruce to continue the firm’s success by accelerating innovation in the environmental, cultural resources, planning, and design fields. 

    Our leadership team, who are friends and colleagues, celebrate healthy ideological debates and collaborative problem-solving. Their success is based on the simple art of listening to our staff, team members, and clients. This co-creation philosophy fosters innovation, boldness, and cohesion that ensures our client’s collective success. We understand that big ideas come from our staff’s ability to share ideas openly. Logan Simpson celebrates and fosters an inclusive culture that is inviting and reflective of our changing social environment.  

    Though the faces are changing as we transition our leadership, Logan Simpson will continue to be, at its core, a multidisciplinary consulting firm that guides responsible change.  We will continue to bring unique and creative solutions to complicated problems that build on Diane’s success through her decades of leadership.   

    Bring on the next 30 years.

  • US Forest Service Amends Rule for Powerline Maintenance and Vegetation Management

    Electric utilities provide vital energy services to customers. Efficient and environmentally safe powerline maintenance and vegetation management is critical to providing safe and reliable delivery of electricity. Implementing a coordinated and cooperative approach between utilities and agencies before, during, and after powerline maintenance and vegetation management increases maintenance efficiencies.



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  • Hearing Native Voices: The Navajo-Gallup Water Supply Project

    Jewel Touchin, Senior Archaeologist

    Western values and perspectives often drive the legislation and compliance laws that apply to cultural resource investigations. In projects like the Navajo Gallup Water Supply Project, Logan Simpson strives to reclaim Native Americans’ points of view so traditional cultural values are considered.

    The United States Congress passed the Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009, Title X Part III (Public Law 111-11), authorizing the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) to construct, operate, and maintain the Navajo-Gallup Water Supply Project (NGWSP). The NGWSP will provide a reliable water source to indigenous communities and municipalities within the arid Southwest, bringing running water to many households for the first time.



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  • Don’t Postpone – Pivot!

    “What should we keep moving forward with, and how?” is one of the most common questions clients ask us during COVID-19. This is especially difficult because the present pandemic impacts so many fundamental aspects of our life: our health, our psychology, our relationships, our schedules, and our household and organization’s pocketbooks.  While it is tempting to postpone meetings and milestones, it is better to embrace alternative facilitation and delivery options to ensure projects continue to move forward and stakeholders remain informed.

    You know that initiatives require buy-in to become a reality, so how can you promote understanding and help people feel heard during the new normal—especially when your agency has been a late adopter of emerging technologies?



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  • Queen Creek gets two new schools

    For families in Phoenix’s East Valley, back to school won’t be just about returning – it will include exploring  entirely new campuses. 

    Logan Simpson is proud to have been a part of the Silver Valley school project! Our team provided hardscape, landscape, irrigation and site design. The site design including all site planning- fields, courts, walks, fire lane location, parking lot layout, and fencing.

    From azfamily.com: 

    Silver Valley Elementary will have nearly 600 pre-K through sixth-grade students for its first year. School officials say it’ll be STEAM focused. It’s decked out with high-tech technology like smart panels which give teachers the ability to write and save their work on a big monitor. It also has breakout areas in the hallways with special paint that transforms the walls into a dry erase surface. Students can write on the walls with a dry erase marker, and it’ll come off.

    Lamb said it cost a total of $70 million to build both schools and that a voter-approved bond paid for half of it and the other half came from the state.

    Check out the video here! 

    Two new schools will be opening soon in Phoenix’s East Valley
  • Artist Highlight: How Koryn Rolstad’s Art Installations bring color to the Tempe Streetcar 

    ‘ILLUMINATED NATURE AND CONNECTIONS’

    If you’ve driven through downtown Tempe recently, you’ve noticed some street construction going on.  In addition to the now-ubiquitous cranes lifting residential towers into the skyline, Mill Avenue, Ash Avenue, Rio Salado, and Apache Boulevard are all being prepared for the new and much-anticipated Streetcar.

    Beyond the track and the new stations, the Tempe Streetcar will also feature beautiful art installations by a variety of artists.  One of the creative minds behind the installations took some time to talk with us about her work.



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