Education

  • Becoming Utility-Scale Solar Ready

    Colorado is expected to deploy around nine gigawatts of renewables by Jan 1, 2030 to meet its energy goals, yet cities and counties have not identified where solar would be acceptable. Logan Simpson’s Jeremy Call and Erin Bibeau partnered with the Colorado Solar and Storage Association (COSSA) on the Becoming Utility-Scale Solar Ready: Principles and Best Practices for Colorado’s Local Goverments study. The study includes five key principles/best practices:

    1. Cultivate awareness ahead of proposed development
    2. Create a collaborative, problem-solving partnership with continuous improvement and learning
    3. Maximize community benefits and desired outcomes
    4. Reduce impacts
    5. Align agencies, plans, and regulations

    Potential conflicts between solar projects and local communities can hold back economic growth and greenhouse gas emission reduction. The study applies each principle to common misconceptions and provides tools, partnerships, and opportunities for local governments to attract multimillion-dollar investments in solar while also protecting the public interest.

    Learn more here: https://lnkd.in/e2jgEXbj.

  • Queen Creek gets two new schools

    For families in Phoenix’s East Valley, back to school won’t be just about returning – it will include exploring  entirely new campuses.

    Logan Simpson is proud to have been a part of the Silver Valley school project! Our team provided hardscape, landscape, irrigation and site design. The site design including all site planning- fields, courts, walks, fire lane location, parking lot layout, and fencing.

    From azfamily.com:

    Silver Valley Elementary will have nearly 600 pre-K through sixth-grade students for its first year. School officials say it’ll be STEAM focused. It’s decked out with high-tech technology like smart panels which give teachers the ability to write and save their work on a big monitor. It also has breakout areas in the hallways with special paint that transforms the walls into a dry erase surface. Students can write on the walls with a dry erase marker, and it’ll come off.

    Lamb said it cost a total of million to build both schools and that a voter-approved bond paid for half of it and the other half came from the state.

    Check out the video here! 

    Two new schools will be opening soon in Phoenix’s East Valley