The Woodrow Residence’s NRHP Nomination has been Accepted!

Logan Simpson is proud to announce that the application for the Woodrow Residence in Tucson, Arizona has been accepted, and the historic home is now recognized in the National Register of Historic Places!

The home was built in 1957at 8649 E. Woodland Road, in Tucson by architect Arthur Brown on behalf of Julie and Arthur Woodrow. Brown was one of the pioneers of passive solar design in architecture. His designs are notable as some of the earliest examples of experimental solar architecture in not just Arizona, but the entire United States. While not well known among the general population, his work is celebrated and beloved among architects, who consider him a pioneer and leader of modern sustainable design.

 

The Woodrow residence is significant among Brown’s works for its innovative sustainable elements, including a radiant heating system, and an in-house chiller and boiler, which were uncommon and very expensive at the time it was installed. The property is also significant because few of Brown’s rural properties remain intact in southern Arizona.

Architect Gordon Brown, the son of Arthur Brown, was an incredible resource, and sat down for interviews with Jennifer Levstik, Logan Simpson’s Architectural Historian, to discuss his father’s work and the history of the property. As the keeper of his father’s records, Gordon is dedicated to preserving his father’s legacy and worked with Jennifer to navigate the archives for important documents. Gordon also led a renovation to the property in the 1970s, and is looking forward to returning with Ms. Levstik to visit the property.

Logan Simpson worked with the property’s current owner, Susan Wick, to prepare a National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) nomination application. Logan Simpson completed architectural documentation, including recordation of building materials and construction techniques; and a condition assessment, including photography, site mapping, and illustrations of floor plans and elevations. For the site photography, Logan Simpson also used professional photographer A.T. Willett to document the property. The detailed photos proved an invaluable tool in guiding State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) and other reviewers towards a determination of eligibility and later listing in the NRHP.