News

  • Work-Life Balance: Logan Simpson’s Babies at Work Policy

    Logan Simpson likes babies.

    When most companies offer a family-friendly work environment as part of their benefit packages, it usually means they allow parents to adjust their work hours around their children’s medical appointments or school hours. Environmental planning firm Logan Simpson takes that work-life balance benefit a step further with their baby-at-work policy.

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  • West Central Mountains Economic Development Strategy Published

    Logan Simpson’s Community Planning Team facilitated the development of the West Central Mountains Economic Development Strategy.  The Strategy represents the first time communities within the two-county area collaborated to develop an action-oriented, regional plan that nurtures a diverse economy while honoring the area’s socio-economic heritage. read more

  • Second Graders Love Mehaffey Park

    MP_1Lincoln Elementary second graders in Mrs. Johnson’s class recently explored a brand new city park called Mehaffey Park in Loveland, Colorado. The students wrote a book, recorded a song, made videos (see link below), and wrote a letter to the editor of the local newspaper about what they observed and learned exploring the pond, adventure playground, picnic shelters, natural areas, soccer fields, skate park, arboretum, dog park, and tennis courts.

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  • Using Low Impact Development to Enhance Communities

    landscape architecture design low impact development

    Bioswales capture a storm’s first flush, which contains most of the pollutants from paved surfaces.

    It doesn’t rain very often in the desert, but when it does, we often lose the opportunity to capture an increasingly important resource: water. Stormwater provides a free source of irrigation water for landscapes and reduces the burden on city storm drainage systems. Where low impact development (LID) practices are used, naturally occurring storms can help conserve water use and reduce flooding hazards in urban areas. By capturing stormwater and using it close to its source, LID can enhance communities and reduce the impacts of development on downstream communities, streams and rivers.

    LID was originally developed to reduce flows to combined sewers in coastal cities, and improve water quality at outfalls into natural water bodies. It is a landscape architecture design approach that can provide low tech, user friendly ways to apply water resource conservation at a local level. LID is now being adapted for use in arid areas of the Southwest where infrequent and unpredictable storms can wreak havoc in urban areas.
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  • Designing a New Logo to Reflect the Logan Simpson Brand

    Updating the Logan Simpson Logo

    I’d been waiting for the opportunity to redesign our logo for a long time—I mean really long. I had toyed with and casually sketched redesign ideas for years. So when rebranding was green-lighted, I was thoroughly warmed up and ready to go. And I wasn’t alone. Well before we kicked off the process, there was a definite firmwide buzz about the need to update and reshape our image and messaging to convey a more modern, all-encompassing, national aesthetic. Most everyone agreed that 2015—which marks our 25th anniversary—was the year to regroup, bolster our vision, and repolish and reintroduce our brand.

    The logo development process began with charrettes to kick-start ideas for redesigning our logo. I drafted almost everything I could think of to catalyze opinions and help focus the review group’s direction. I wanted us to eventually reach that one great idea—much like firing arrow after arrow into a large target area, trying to hit the bull’s-eye. It was a lot of fun, actually, just raw design with little to restrain me. My only guidelines at that point in the process were maintaining the color palette and shortening our name to “Logan Simpson.” Other than that, I could move freely in the design space, testing out new logo compositions, from ones that played on the familiar triple-icon form to ones that were more radical reinventions, like a single icon. Regardless, I was mindful that each of my designs had to graphically honor our origins while speaking to our future.
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  • The Evolution of Our Name to Logan Simpson

    We’ve done it. We’ve dropped LSD.

    Until recently, the acronym for our landscape architecture design and environmental planning firm was “LSD,” which stood variously for Logan Simpson & Dye, and later, Logan Simpson Design, Inc. But as our 25th anniversary approached, we began to spruce up our image with a new logo and refine our mission for the next quarter-century. Our thoughts turned to whether our name was truly representative of all the work we do—which now stands at about 20 percent design, 26 percent environmental services, 14 percent community and general planning, and 40 percent cultural resources services.
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  • Logan Simpson Launches Redesigned Website

    2015 has been a great year for Logan Simpson, and we’re looking forward to sharing our accomplishments with you! In addition to celebrating our 25th anniversary, we are excited to announce the official launch of our new website.

    We know that our clients are at the heart of everything we do, which is why we designed our new site with them in mind. With a focus to blend together our world of scientists and designers, our new homepage is filled with bright colors and engaging imagery that reflect our work as a top landscape architecture design and environmental planning firm. If you are interested in seeing some of the projects we have completed or are currently working on, our homepage showcases a visually stunning array of our portfolio. Additionally, you can view snapshots from our Knowledge Center, making it easy to stay up-to-date on recent blogs from our experts. Our team bios are also now on the homepage, so you can get to know the Logan Simpson team members you’ll be working with right from the beginning.
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