Historic Archaeology

  • Town of Florence Padilla Park Wins Award

    padilla park bottle pathDrum roll please … Arizona Forward and SRP presented 17 first-place Crescordia awards and 31 Awards of Merit. More than 120 entries were received in Arizona’s oldest and most prestigious awards competition focusing exclusively on sustainability. Logan Simpson had a role on two of the winning projects.

    Silver King Marketplace / Padilla Park won an Award of Merit in the Buildings and Structures Historic Preservation category. Construction workers discovered historic bottles in an archaeological context during the initial grading of a park for the Town of Florence. Construction work was suspended while Logan Simpson completed a site evaluation and data recovery excavations. read more

  • History is Re-Created in Tombstone as Part of ADOT Project on SR 80

    Project Update! Logan Simpson landscape architects, environmental planners, and historians assisted the City of Tombstone with design and environmental compliance for a transportation enhancement –funded project within the boundaries of the Tombstone National Historic Landmark.  read more

  • Logan Simpson Cultural Resources Specialists Published

    Chris Watkins, MA, RPAAlliance and Landscape on Perry Mesa in the Fourteenth Century is the first major publication about the archaeology of Perry Mesa and contains contributions by Logan Simpson archaeologists Christopher Watkins, left, and Tina Hart.

    The book, published by the University of Utah Press, examines the population aggregation on Perry Mesa, a landscape that was largely vacant prior to the late A.D. 1200s. From the late 1200s to the early 1400s, thousands of people occupied large pueblos that were equally spaced along the mesa rim. Alliance and Landscape on Perry Mesa in the Fourteenth Century utilizes two explanatory frameworks, alliance and landscape, to explore why people migrated to Perry Mesa. The alliance model posits that groups on Perry Mesa allied with other nearby groups to form what is known as the Verde Confederacy against the Phoenix Basin Hohokam to the south. The landscape model suggests that the changing environmental conditions in the late 1200s made Perry Mesa more attractive for migrating farmers. The archaeological record reveals evidence in support of both models, and in Alliance and Landscape on Perry Mesa in the Fourteenth Century, researchers present and evaluate this evidence to better understand an important but little studied region in central Arizona.

    In Chapter 6, Watkins and Arizona State Parks Archaeologist Sophia Kelly investigate the organization of production and exchange of plain ware ceramics within the proposed Verde Confederacy. With the aid of ceramic provenance data, they assess the extent to which plain ware ceramics moved between late prehistoric pueblos on Perry Mesa and between members of the larger confederacy. Two interaction spheres of socially proximate people were identified on Perry Mesa and the Upper Verde River as indicated by large quantities of internally exchanged plain ware vessels. This result does not preclude the existence of a higher-order confederation as low-value objects such as cooking pots were not necessarily exchanged at more distant social scales.

    In Chapter 5, Demarcation of the Landscape: Rock Art Evidence for Alliance, Conflict, and Subsistence at Perry Mesa, Hart and others examine variation among the relative frequencies of rock art motifs, such as geometric and zoomorphic  designs,  across six sites on Perry Mesa. Rock art at these six sites is also compared to rock art sites in the surrounding region in an effort to find stylistic and thematic similarities that may support the Verde Confederacy model. The chapter also explores the relationship between Perry Mesa rock art and Hopi clan symbols. The results of this analysis offer preliminary conclusions regarding the role of rock art across the cultural and physical landscape of Perry Mesa.

    Justin Rego’s article, ‘Gradiometry Survey and Magnetic Anomaly Testing of Castros de Neixón, Galicia, Spain,’ is in the latest Journal of Archaeological Science.

    During the summer of 2011, a geophysical survey with subsequent magnetic anomaly testing was conducted in Northwest Iberia, in the province of Galicia, Spain, the most extensive evaluation of its kind to be performed on a Castro Culture hill fort with distinct Bronze and Iron Age occupations. The investigation focused on determining the spatial extent, occupation, and use of the multicomponent Bronze and Iron Age hill fort site(s) of Castros de Neixón. Justin is lead author on this paper, which he co-authored with  Wendy H Cegielski, M.A., of Arizona State University.

  • Mark Hackbarth Discusses First Phoenix Cemetery

    Mark Hackbarth, RPA

    Mark Hackbarth, RPA

    LSD’s Mark Hackbarth gave a presentation on the First Phoenix Cemetery as part of the monthly Archaeology Southwest gathering. Logan Simpson Design recently completed a historic archaeology project in downtown Phoenix at the construction site for the new Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office Complex.

    See the video here.

    In May 2012 construction crews at Fifth Avenue and Jackson Street unexpectedly unearthed graves predating 1885. LSD  archaeologists responded to complete a phased data recovery excavation and burial recovery project while construction activities continued elsewhere on the site. The archaeological dig and associated research brought to light the city’s mysterious, long-forgotten cemetery and failed railroad company.

    Mark is an archaeologist with more than 30 years of supervisory experience in Southwestern archaeology. Mark has completed eight major excavation projects in downtown Phoenix, plus archival investigations. He is a recognized expert in Hohokam archaeology of the Salt River Valley and Northern Periphery. He has an equal amount of experience with the historic period in central Arizona.

  • Kathryn Leonard named to Historic Preservation Commission

    Kathryn Leonard, M.A., RPALSD Cultural Resources Director Kathryn Leonard, M.A., RPA, was appointed by the Phoenix City Council to the Phoenix Historic Preservation Commission. The nine-member commission maintains the Phoenix Historic Property Register and makes recommendations to the City Council and citizens regarding historic preservation.

    Members represent the fields of history, architecture, prehistoric and historic archaeology, and related disciplines. During her three year term, Kathryn will assist the city’s Preservation Officer in reviewing appeals on proposed alterations to historic properties, historic districts and archeological resources through the Certificate of Appropriateness process; and make funding recommendations for Historic Preservation Bond Funds.

    Kathryn, who resides in Phoenix’s Fairview Place Historic District, manages the cultural resources program at LSD and provides Section 106 of the NHPA support, including government-to-government consultation, for large, complex energy EIS projects.

  • Logan Simpson Cultural Resources Team Wins Contract for Victory Hotel

    Victory Hotel Las Vegas

    Victory Hotel Las Vegas

    Logan Simpson historic preservation specialists are assisting the City of Las Vegas to assess the rehabilitation potential of the historic Victory Hotel. Logan Simpson teamed with a historical architect, a structural engineer, and a general contractor to provide a comprehensive Historic Building Rehabilitation Assessment of one of the city’s oldest buildings. Built in 1910, the Victory Hotel (then called the Lincoln Hotel), is a two-story masonry building constructed in the Mission Revival architectural style.  It is the last remaining example of a small hotel built to serve miners, workers, and patrons of the San Pedro, Los Angeles, and Salt Lake Railroad. The current owner is planning redevelopment of the site.  Logan Simpson’s work will assist the city Planning Department and Ward 3 Councilman Bob Coffin who are evaluating alternatives to demolition of the hotel building, including possible relocation or rehabilitation. If relocated, the hotel could join four restored railroad worker cottages, built between 1909 and 1911, at the Las Vegas Springs Preserve for an educational attraction that embraces the history of the railroad in Las Vegas. The Springs Preserve cottage exhibit is scheduled to be completed in spring of 2014.

  • Christopher Garraty, Ph.D., RPA Joins Logan Simpson Design

    Christopher Garraty, Ph.D., RPA

    Christopher Garraty, Ph.D., RPA

    Logan Simpson Design Inc., one of the largest environmental planning and landscape architecture firms in the West, announced today it has hired Christopher Garraty, Ph.D., RPA, as a principal investigator in our Tempe office.

    Chris has more than 17 years of experience, most recently working for the Gila River Indian Community in their Cultural Resource Management Program as a Project Manager in Sacaton, Arizona.

    His regional and topical expertise includes ceramics analysis and technological change, development of  complex societies and premodern markets, and Spanish Colonialism.  He has conducted research on the Postclassic (Aztec) central Mexico (Aztec), Mexican Gulf lowlands, and in the American Southwest.  His analytical focus involves ceramic compositional analysis, elemental characterization techniques, multivariate statistics, heuristic approaches, exploratory data analysis (EDA), and spatial statistics.

    Chris obtained his Ph.D. and his M.A. in Anthropology from the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University, and he obtained his BA in Anthropology from Temple University in Pennsylvania.

  • Logan Simpson’s Cultural Resources Team Wins Contract for Casa Grande Ruins National Monument

    Logan Simpson’s cultural resources team is assisting the National Park Service revise an existing National Register nomination for the Visitor and Operations Complex Historic District located within Casa Grande Ruins National Monument. 

    The District covers approximately 160 acres and consists of three clusters of building complexes (the visitor compound, maintenance compound, and residential compound), all of which were built by the park service and Civilian Conservation Corps between 1928 and 1963.  Located 50 miles southeast of Phoenix, the ruins themselves are much, much older. Eusebio Francisco Kino, S.J., who founded Arizona’s first Jesuit mission, recorded his visit to the ruins in 1694.

    Logan Simpson’s cultural resources team is working with State Historic Preservation Office staff to develop an appropriate strategy for obtaining concurrence on the document. Our historical archaeologist is revising the draft National Register nomination to address SHPO’s comments and concerns. SHPO will then use the completed nomination to obtain concurrence on the District’s Cultural Landscape Inventory. These documents will assist National Park Service staff in the management of the park’s built and cultural landscape resources.

     

  • Logan Simpson Environmental Consultants to Survey Delamar Lake for Lincoln County Archaeological Initiative

    Logan Simpson archaeologists and environmental consultants will be conducting GIS modeling and a pedestrian inventory to identify archaeological sites at Delamar Lake in Lincoln County, Nevada.

    The remote, dry lakebed, west of the Delamar Mountains, dates back to the Pleistocene period. The Logan Simpson Team has identified more than fifty sites of early human activity in Nevada and Utah associated with the Pleistocene period. Our goal is to locate and record sites of early human activity to help the BLM in the Southern Nevada District meet its agency goals.

    The BLM established the Lincoln County Archaeological Initiative (LCAI) to allocate monies from the auction of public land to fund historic archaeology inventory, evaluation, protection, and management of cultural resources in Lincoln County. Proposals are submitted annually to the BLM. Following a rigorous, competitive process, awards are made based on the quality of the proposed research, how that research fits the needs of the LCAI, and the overall qualifications of the applicant.

     

  • Prescott Archaeological Mapping Firm Compass Rose joins Logan Simpson in Environmental Planning

    Compass Rose Technical Services has joined Logan Simpson to continue to provide exceptional environmental planning services. Archaeologist and Compass Rose founder Stephanie Sherwood has joined Logan Simpson as an archaeological cartographer. For more than a decade, Compass Rose specialized in providing computer-aided cartography; GIS applications; field mapping; and freehand drafting/illustration for archaeological projects. read more