Cultural Resources

  • Justin Rego, M.A., RPA Wins SPARC Grant

    Congratulations to Logan Simpson’s Justin Rego who just received word that the project he’s leading with co-PIs Wendy Cegielski, M.A. (Arizona State University), and Ignacio Grau-Mira, PhD (University of Alicante) has won a Spatial Archaeometry Research Collaborations (SPARC) grant.

    The team will be collaborating with SPARC researchers to pursue advanced datafusion techniques and the integration of LiDAR imagery to investigate the structure and organization of the urban, Iberian fortified settlement of Mariola in Eastern Spain. read more

  • Erick Laurila Promoted to Assistant Director of Cultural Resources

    Archaeologist Erick Laurila, M.A., RPA, has been promoted to the position of Assistant Director of Cultural Resources in Logan Simpson’s Tempe, Arizona office. In his new role, Erick will be working with the Director of Cultural Resources to oversee GIS, graphics, and mobile electronic data collection technologies as well as managing client relations, projects, and staff. Erick has worked at Logan Simpson for five years, and he has more than 10 years of experience coordinating and supervising cultural resources survey, archaeological excavation and monitoring throughout Arizona and New Mexico. read more

  • Erin Davis Promoted to Assistant Director of Cultural Resources

    Archaeologist Erin Davis, M.A., RPA, has been promoted to the position of Assistant Director of Cultural Resources in Logan Simpson’s Tempe, Arizona office. In her new role, Erin will work with the Director of Cultural Resources to manage client relations, projects and staff assignments worked out of the Tempe office. Erin began her career in 1994 and has worked at Logan Simpson since 2010. She has spent decades conducting archaeological survey, excavations, and monitoring and preparing reports detailing the results of these activities and providing recommendations for NRHP eligibility and effects projects may have upon historic properties. She received her B.A. from the University of Massachusetts, Boston, in 1997 and her M.A. from the University of Leicester in 2011.

  • Mark Hackbarth Reappointed to Scottsdale Historic Preservation Commission

    Mark Hackbarth, RPA

    Mark Hackbarth, RPA

    Scottsdale City Council reappointed Mark Hackbarth to Scottsdale’s Historic Preservation Commission. Mark, a 22-year Scottsdale resident, recently completed a three-year term. The seven-member commission oversees the development and management of Scottsdale’s Historic Preservation Program. read more

  • Jesse Adams Promoted to Director of Cultural Resources, Salt Lake City

    Logan Simpson Design Inc., one of the largest landscape architecture design and environmental planning firms in the West, announced today it has promoted Jesse Adams, a senior environmental archaeologist, to director of cultural services for our Salt Lake City and Corvallis, OR offices.
    Jesse has more than 14 years of experience supervising archaeological inventory, monitoring, testing, and data recovery projects. He has extensive experience throughout the Intermountain West and Great Basin regions; and has managed and directed more than 40 cultural resource projects for various state and federal agencies, energy development companies, and mining clients. read more

  • Logan Simpson Welcomes New Archaeologists Travis Cureton and Michael Bryk

    Archaeologists Travis Cureton and Michael Bryk joined the Tempe office. Travis has 13 years of experience and recently completed his Master’s Thesis entitled Cohonina Social Organization and the Role of Forts in Integration and Interaction: A View From the Pittsberg Community. Travis is working on tasks related to Logan Simpson’s recent IDIQ contract with Region 3 of the U.S. Forest Service. Michael has more than five years of experience, and comes to Logan Simpson from the Cultural Resource Management Program at the Gila River Indian Community. He is currently working on a variety of projects, including survey of state land parcels for Arizona’s Department of Forestry.

  • Archaeologists Provide Leadership

    Christopher Garraty, Ph.D., RPA

    Our Tempe cultural resources firm is home to three of the Arizona Archaeological Council’s (AAC) 10-member governing board. Research Director Christopher Garraty, Ph.D., RPA, (left) is the current President of the AAC and will serve the board in 2015 in an advisory role as Immediate Past President; Leigh Davidson is the current Secretary of the AAC through the end of 2015; and Justin P. Rego, M.A., RPA, was recently elected as the AAC’s new Information Technology Officer starting in 2015. Justin, Leigh, and Chris will help shape the future of the AAC and bring in new ideas and agendas for improving the lot of professional archaeologists throughout the state. read more

  • Logan Simpson Cultural Resources Specialists Published

    Chris Watkins, MA, RPAAlliance and Landscape on Perry Mesa in the Fourteenth Century is the first major publication about the archaeology of Perry Mesa and contains contributions by Logan Simpson archaeologists Christopher Watkins, left, and Tina Hart.

    The book, published by the University of Utah Press, examines the population aggregation on Perry Mesa, a landscape that was largely vacant prior to the late A.D. 1200s. From the late 1200s to the early 1400s, thousands of people occupied large pueblos that were equally spaced along the mesa rim. Alliance and Landscape on Perry Mesa in the Fourteenth Century utilizes two explanatory frameworks, alliance and landscape, to explore why people migrated to Perry Mesa. The alliance model posits that groups on Perry Mesa allied with other nearby groups to form what is known as the Verde Confederacy against the Phoenix Basin Hohokam to the south. The landscape model suggests that the changing environmental conditions in the late 1200s made Perry Mesa more attractive for migrating farmers. The archaeological record reveals evidence in support of both models, and in Alliance and Landscape on Perry Mesa in the Fourteenth Century, researchers present and evaluate this evidence to better understand an important but little studied region in central Arizona.

    In Chapter 6, Watkins and Arizona State Parks Archaeologist Sophia Kelly investigate the organization of production and exchange of plain ware ceramics within the proposed Verde Confederacy. With the aid of ceramic provenance data, they assess the extent to which plain ware ceramics moved between late prehistoric pueblos on Perry Mesa and between members of the larger confederacy. Two interaction spheres of socially proximate people were identified on Perry Mesa and the Upper Verde River as indicated by large quantities of internally exchanged plain ware vessels. This result does not preclude the existence of a higher-order confederation as low-value objects such as cooking pots were not necessarily exchanged at more distant social scales.

    In Chapter 5, Demarcation of the Landscape: Rock Art Evidence for Alliance, Conflict, and Subsistence at Perry Mesa, Hart and others examine variation among the relative frequencies of rock art motifs, such as geometric and zoomorphic  designs,  across six sites on Perry Mesa. Rock art at these six sites is also compared to rock art sites in the surrounding region in an effort to find stylistic and thematic similarities that may support the Verde Confederacy model. The chapter also explores the relationship between Perry Mesa rock art and Hopi clan symbols. The results of this analysis offer preliminary conclusions regarding the role of rock art across the cultural and physical landscape of Perry Mesa.

    Justin Rego’s article, ‘Gradiometry Survey and Magnetic Anomaly Testing of Castros de Neixón, Galicia, Spain,’ is in the latest Journal of Archaeological Science.

    During the summer of 2011, a geophysical survey with subsequent magnetic anomaly testing was conducted in Northwest Iberia, in the province of Galicia, Spain, the most extensive evaluation of its kind to be performed on a Castro Culture hill fort with distinct Bronze and Iron Age occupations. The investigation focused on determining the spatial extent, occupation, and use of the multicomponent Bronze and Iron Age hill fort site(s) of Castros de Neixón. Justin is lead author on this paper, which he co-authored with  Wendy H Cegielski, M.A., of Arizona State University.

  • Lincoln County Archaeological Initiative

    Jesse Adams, M.A., RPALogan Simpson Design environmental consultants are currently conducting a number of long-term, research-driven inventory projects for the Bureau of Land Management in Lincoln County, Nevada.

    As part of a sample archaeological inventory near Delamar Lake, LSD has developed a GIS predictive model to help identify high, medium, and low probability areas of cultural resources associated with the Terminal Pleistocene-Early Holocene (TPEH) transition period.

    Our GIS model focuses on several critical factors likely to influence site distribution during the TPEH transition period such asproximity to high-probability landforms (lakeshores, beaches, or indented shorelines); extinct marshes or deltas; and elevated surfaces near wetlands.

    Delamar Lake cultural resourcesDelamar Lake is situated within a Pleistocene pluvial lake bed and, like other nearby pluvial lake beds, is a high probability area for Paleoarchaic archaeological sites. The now arid lake would likely have supported a marsh/riparian-type ecosystem during the TPEH.

    Throughout the process, our goal was to identify the TPEH, or Paleoarchaic, archaeological sites near Delamar Lake in order to establish baseline inventory data for locating TPEH-aged cultural resources in other pluvial lakebeds in Lincoln County.

    read more

  • Mark Hackbarth Discusses First Phoenix Cemetery

    Mark Hackbarth, RPA

    Mark Hackbarth, RPA

    LSD’s Mark Hackbarth gave a presentation on the First Phoenix Cemetery as part of the monthly Archaeology Southwest gathering. Logan Simpson Design recently completed a historic archaeology project in downtown Phoenix at the construction site for the new Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office Complex.

    See the video here.

    In May 2012 construction crews at Fifth Avenue and Jackson Street unexpectedly unearthed graves predating 1885. LSD  archaeologists responded to complete a phased data recovery excavation and burial recovery project while construction activities continued elsewhere on the site. The archaeological dig and associated research brought to light the city’s mysterious, long-forgotten cemetery and failed railroad company.

    Mark is an archaeologist with more than 30 years of supervisory experience in Southwestern archaeology. Mark has completed eight major excavation projects in downtown Phoenix, plus archival investigations. He is a recognized expert in Hohokam archaeology of the Salt River Valley and Northern Periphery. He has an equal amount of experience with the historic period in central Arizona.