• Mark Hackbarth Reappointed to Scottsdale Historic Preservation Commission

    Mark Hackbarth, RPA

    Mark Hackbarth, RPA

    Scottsdale City Council reappointed Mark Hackbarth to Scottsdale’s Historic Preservation Commission. Mark, a 22-year Scottsdale resident, recently completed a three-year term. The seven-member commission oversees the development and management of Scottsdale’s Historic Preservation Program. read more

  • Logan Simpson Welcomes Archaeologists Jim Hasbargen and Alex New

    Jim Hasbargen will be working from Flagstaff, Arizona. Alex New will be working from La Grande, Oregon. Jim has 20 years of experience in Southwestern archaeology and graduate degrees in both archaeology and quaternary studies. He has produced or contributed to more than 80 technical reports on survey projects, testing and data recovery excavations, ceramic analysis, botanical analysis, palynology, site monitoring, and ruin stabilization. Alex has nine years of experience and recently completed his Master’s Thesis entitled Cooperation in the Wilds of the Idaho Territory: Interaction between the Jesuits and Coeur d’Alene Indians at the Cataldo Mission, 1848-1878.

  • Logan Simpson Welcomes Michael Chalona, PLA

    Michael ChalonaMichael Chalona, PLA, LEED AP BD+C, joined the Fort Collins office as a senior associate landscape architect. Michael is a registered landscape architect in five states, and brings 21 years of experience and leadership in sustainable design and construction to our environmental planning firm. He is experienced in project, contract, and consultant management; real estate development; and project permitting; and is considered an expert in land use and zoning codes. A skilled leader in directing projects from conceptual design through construction, Michael is passionate about the sustainable landscape architecture design of outdoor spaces that are beautiful, and enduring.

    New additions to our landscape design practice also include Ran Ran and Mark Kieser in Tempe, and Tyler Smithson in Salt Lake City.

  • Logan Simpson Welcomes New Archaeologists Travis Cureton and Michael Bryk

    Archaeologists Travis Cureton and Michael Bryk joined the Tempe office. Travis has 13 years of experience and recently completed his Master’s Thesis entitled Cohonina Social Organization and the Role of Forts in Integration and Interaction: A View From the Pittsberg Community. Travis is working on tasks related to Logan Simpson’s recent IDIQ contract with Region 3 of the U.S. Forest Service. Michael has more than five years of experience, and comes to Logan Simpson from the Cultural Resource Management Program at the Gila River Indian Community. He is currently working on a variety of projects, including survey of state land parcels for Arizona’s Department of Forestry.

  • Logan Simpson Design a Finalist for January 8th Memorial

    landscape architecture design tucson memorialThe January 8th Memorial Foundation has selected Logan Simpson and three other finalists out of the 60 practices and artists who submitted applications to create a permanent memorial and master plan concept for the El Presidio Park in Tucson. The permanent memorial would commemorate the January 8, 2011, mass shooting that wounded Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, killed six people and injured 12 others. The memorial is also intended to honor the spirit of the Tucson community in its responses to the tragedy and to inspire future generations to work together on community issues.

    For more information about the foundation and memorial plans, visit

  • Trace Baker Promoted to Business Development Director

    Trace BakerLogan Simpson promoted Trace Baker to the position of business development for the firm, which has six offices. Based in Logan Simpson’s Tempe community planning firm, Trace has been with the firm for nearly a decade and has more than 25 years of experience in business development, marketing, and proposal development.

    As business development director, Trace is responsible for identifying opportunities and building relationships with teaming partners and clients. She is also responsible for leading the firm’s business development, branding, and market research strategies.

  • Archaeologists Provide Leadership

    Christopher Garraty, Ph.D., RPA

    Our Tempe cultural resources firm is home to three of the Arizona Archaeological Council’s (AAC) 10-member governing board. Research Director Christopher Garraty, Ph.D., RPA, (left) is the current President of the AAC and will serve the board in 2015 in an advisory role as Immediate Past President; Leigh Davidson is the current Secretary of the AAC through the end of 2015; and Justin P. Rego, M.A., RPA, was recently elected as the AAC’s new Information Technology Officer starting in 2015. Justin, Leigh, and Chris will help shape the future of the AAC and bring in new ideas and agendas for improving the lot of professional archaeologists throughout the state. read more

  • Kris Gray Promoted to Marketing Manager

    Kris GrayKris Gray was promoted to marketing manager at Logan Simpson Design Inc. Logan Simpson is a woman-owned, landscape architecture design and environmental planning firm that works throughout the western United States.
    When Kris joined Logan Simpson in October 2003, his role primarily involved proposal coordination duties for the Tempe and Tucson offices. Since then he has taken on business development and proposal responsibilities that span the firm’s growing service lines and presence in Nevada, Utah, Colorado, and Oregon. As marketing manager, his duties include managing the firm’s overall proposal effort, preparing proposals and marketing collateral, and assisting in branding and business development strategy.
    With 14 years of experience in the A/E/C industry, Kris is a board member of the Arizona Chapter of the Society for Marketing Professional Services. Through SMPS he has held an active role in Phoenix Canstruction, which benefits St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance.

  • Logan Simpson Cultural Resources Specialists Published

    Chris Watkins, MA, RPAAlliance and Landscape on Perry Mesa in the Fourteenth Century is the first major publication about the archaeology of Perry Mesa and contains contributions by Logan Simpson archaeologists Christopher Watkins, left, and Tina Hart.

    The book, published by the University of Utah Press, examines the population aggregation on Perry Mesa, a landscape that was largely vacant prior to the late A.D. 1200s. From the late 1200s to the early 1400s, thousands of people occupied large pueblos that were equally spaced along the mesa rim. Alliance and Landscape on Perry Mesa in the Fourteenth Century utilizes two explanatory frameworks, alliance and landscape, to explore why people migrated to Perry Mesa. The alliance model posits that groups on Perry Mesa allied with other nearby groups to form what is known as the Verde Confederacy against the Phoenix Basin Hohokam to the south. The landscape model suggests that the changing environmental conditions in the late 1200s made Perry Mesa more attractive for migrating farmers. The archaeological record reveals evidence in support of both models, and in Alliance and Landscape on Perry Mesa in the Fourteenth Century, researchers present and evaluate this evidence to better understand an important but little studied region in central Arizona.

    In Chapter 6, Watkins and Arizona State Parks Archaeologist Sophia Kelly investigate the organization of production and exchange of plain ware ceramics within the proposed Verde Confederacy. With the aid of ceramic provenance data, they assess the extent to which plain ware ceramics moved between late prehistoric pueblos on Perry Mesa and between members of the larger confederacy. Two interaction spheres of socially proximate people were identified on Perry Mesa and the Upper Verde River as indicated by large quantities of internally exchanged plain ware vessels. This result does not preclude the existence of a higher-order confederation as low-value objects such as cooking pots were not necessarily exchanged at more distant social scales.

    In Chapter 5, Demarcation of the Landscape: Rock Art Evidence for Alliance, Conflict, and Subsistence at Perry Mesa, Hart and others examine variation among the relative frequencies of rock art motifs, such as geometric and zoomorphic  designs,  across six sites on Perry Mesa. Rock art at these six sites is also compared to rock art sites in the surrounding region in an effort to find stylistic and thematic similarities that may support the Verde Confederacy model. The chapter also explores the relationship between Perry Mesa rock art and Hopi clan symbols. The results of this analysis offer preliminary conclusions regarding the role of rock art across the cultural and physical landscape of Perry Mesa.

    Justin Rego’s article, ‘Gradiometry Survey and Magnetic Anomaly Testing of Castros de Neixón, Galicia, Spain,’ is in the latest Journal of Archaeological Science.

    During the summer of 2011, a geophysical survey with subsequent magnetic anomaly testing was conducted in Northwest Iberia, in the province of Galicia, Spain, the most extensive evaluation of its kind to be performed on a Castro Culture hill fort with distinct Bronze and Iron Age occupations. The investigation focused on determining the spatial extent, occupation, and use of the multicomponent Bronze and Iron Age hill fort site(s) of Castros de Neixón. Justin is lead author on this paper, which he co-authored with  Wendy H Cegielski, M.A., of Arizona State University.

  • AzASLA Recognizes Tres Rios Environmental Restoration

    Aquatic and riparian vegetationThe Arizona Chapter of American Society of Landscape Architects recently recognized the Tres Rios Environmental Restoration project with an Award of Excellence in the General Design category. Construction, mining, and engineering firm Kiewit Western Co. and LSD worked together on the habitat restoration project for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and City of Phoenix. Phase III work included a native plant inventory; removal and control of invasive species (primarily Salt Cedar); grading and excavation of the historic river channel; and restoration of riparian and wetland marsh habitats within the active stream area.

    Craig Coronato, FASLA, Director of Design, accepted the award for LSD.

    Winning projects received Awards of Excellence or Honor and were judged by landscape architects based upon design and planning quality and execution, response to site context, environmental sensitivity and sustainability, and value to the public, the client, and other designers. Additionally, special awards were given in the categories of Educators of the Year, Friend of the Year, Volunteer of the Year, Sage of the Year, and Landscape Architect of the Year.

    Completed in May 2012, the environmental planning project created 44 acres of new open-water reaches, 10 acres of marsh habitat, and 46 acres of riparian habitat. The Salt, Gila, and Agua Fria river corridors were revegetated with new aquatic plants and cottonwood and willow trees.

    Arizona Chapter of American Public Works Association, also recently selected the Tres Rios Environmental Restoration, Phase 3A & 3B project as this year’s recipient of the Public Works Project of the Year in the Environment – $5 – $25 Million category.

    LSD is also the primary designer for five separate trailheads that will provide gateways to multi-use trails leading to the Overbank Wetlands and Flow Control Wetlands at the 91st Avenue Treatment Plant and the Tres Rios Environmental Restoration project.